RATIONALE FOR ADVENTURE

This adventure will give Wolf Scouts the opportunity to learn more about their neighborhood and community structure, how they can be a part of their community through service, and how others have provided service to our country.

TAKEAWAYS FOR CUB SCOUTS

  • Teamwork
  • Problem solving
  • A Scout is loyal. [Wolf Character Compass]

ADVENTURE REQUIREMENTS (Wolf Handbook, page 50)

  1. Participate in a flag ceremony, and learn how to properly care for and fold the flag.
  2. Work with your den to develop a den duty chart, and perform these tasks for one month.
  3. Do the following:
    a. Learn about the changes in your community, and create a project to show your den how the community has changed.
    b. Select one issue in your community, and present to your den your ideas for a solution to the problem.
  4. Do the following:
    a. Attend the pack committee leaders’ meeting. Present ideas to the pack committee regarding your service project.
    b. Work together on a community service project.
  5. Talk to a military veteran, law enforcement officer, member of the fire department, or someone else who works for the community. Talk about his or her service to the community. After you have visited with the individual, write a short thank-you note.
  6. Do the following:
    a. Learn about the three “R’s” of recycling: reduce, reuse, and recycle. Discover a way to do each of these at home, at school, or in your community.
    b. Make your own recycling center, or contribute to an existing one.
    c. Create a den project from recyclables for a pack meeting.

NOTES TO DEN LEADER

The outing in this adventure is not a den meeting. Instead, the den will be attending a pack committee leaders’ meeting so the boys can observe the process and present their ideas for a service project.

Alert the committee to include the presentation on their agenda. The committee may also ask the den to conduct either an opening or a closing for the meeting. This should be considered when practicing for the presentation.

Once the committee has approved the project, the den can put it into action. The den will need to make separate arrangements for completion of the project based on the specific type of project selected.

Invite a military veteran, member of the fire department, police officer, or community service worker to talk to the den (requirement 5) during Meeting 2. Also, make arrangements well in advance for shipping the military care packages the Scouts will assemble at that meeting. For assistance, contact a local military base, National Guard station, USO office, or American Legion post. The office you contact may be able to suggest items for the packages.

See the Appendix for optional den meeting activities, including gatherings, openings, and closings.

meeting

PREPARATION AND MATERIALS NEEDED

  • U.S. and den flags
  • Five metal washers per Scout and a container with a wide opening (plastic bowl, cardboard box, etc.) for the “Washer Toss Game” (Gathering)
  • List of ideas for community service projects (see requirement 3a in the Wolf Handbook)
  • The den will be selecting a community service project proposal during Meeting 1, and they will present the project during a pack committee leaders’ meeting. Confirm the schedule for the meeting and work with the pack committee chair and parents to coordinate the den’s presentation at that time.
  • The presentation to the committee will be made as part of a den outing for Meeting 3.
  • Contact the local library or historical society to see if photos are available showing development in the den’s neighborhood or community during the last 25 years—streets being constructed, trees cut down, water diverted, etc. You may also be able to collect photos online that show how the area looked many years ago. Gather enough pictures for each Wolf Scout to build a small photo collage in the “Things Change” activity.
  • Whiteboard and a marker for Talk Time
  • Blank cards and pencils for ballot voting
  • A printed copy of the weekly den duty chart (see Meeting 1 Resources)
  • Sheets of poster board and glue or tape for the “Things Change” activity
  • Water balloons for team-building game (if no one in the den has a latex allergy)

GATHERING

Washer Toss Game. Have the Scouts form a circle several feet in diameter. Give each boy five metal washers (if those aren’t available, you may substitute pennies, buttons, or wrapped hard candy). Place the container in the center of the circle, then go around the circle as each boy takes a turn throwing his washers. After he succeeds in tossing all five into the container, let him retrieve the washers and try tossing from a farther distance when his turn comes again.

OPENING (REQUIREMENT 1)

  • Conduct a flag ceremony of your choosing that includes the Pledge of Allegiance and, as appropriate, the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
  • Demonstrate how to properly care for and fold a flag, and actively involve the Wolf Scouts in the demonstration. Refer to the Wolf Handbook and the Appendix for additional guidance.
  • Have the den recite the Outdoor Code.

TALK TIME (REQUIREMENTS 2, 3A, AND 3B)

  • Introduce the Council Fire adventure to the den. Build interest by describing the goals of the adventure and some of the activities that are planned.
  • Carry out business items for the den.
  • Allow time for sharing among Cub Scouts.
  • Discuss changes in the community and service project ideas.
    — Pass around the community photos you gathered or copied. Ask each Scout to point out one thing he sees that has changed, and then discuss the impact of those changes on plant and animal life. Were any animals forced to leave their natural habitats? Is pasture land gone? Has a water source been blocked or even destroyed? Help the boys to see how problems caused by human expansion can be hard to solve in a way that pleases everyone. Some examples: how to deal with litter and graffiti, or zoning disputes over a new shopping mall or skate park.
    — Then have the Scouts narrow their conversation to one community problem and think of ways they could help solve it. Let them also consider the ideas in the Wolf Handbook. If none of these are suitable to your area, you may substitute one that is important to your group. List their ideas on the whiteboard and pass out ballots to vote on the one that seems best. After the vote, lead a reflection on how they came to the solution. Did everyone agree? Maybe not, but being a good citizen means we put the needs of the community ahead of our personal opinions.
  • Finally, have the boys work together to fill out the den duty chart for the month. See requirement 2 in the Wolf Handbook for suggestions, and make sure everyone will have an opportunity to do several jobs. Remind them that “a Scout is loyal,” and they can show loyalty to their den by completing their assigned chores each week. Also, “a Scout is trustworthy”: Their fellow Scouts will trust them to do those chores.

ACTIVITIES

Icon Activity 1: Things Change (Requirement 3a)

Give each Scout a sheet of poster board and some of the neighborhood photos to build a small collage showing changes in their community through the years.

Icon Activity 2: Prepare for Presentation to Pack Committee Leaders

Practice presenting the service project the den has selected to the pack committee leaders. You could offer a skit written by the boys, a digital slide presentation, or a simple oral proposal.

Icon Activity 3: Water Field

  • Play this team-building game. (Remember that Scouting is a safe haven for everybody; no one should be forced to play a game if he doesn’t feel physically or emotionally comfortable with it.)
  • Divide the Scouts into two teams. One at a time, a boy from each team walks across a “water field” (water balloons scattered around the backyard or a grassy area) with his eyes closed or wearing a blindfold. The team to get the most players across the field without getting wet wins. Other players can direct their teammates by shouting instructions to avoid the water (e.g., “two steps to the right”). Note: Before playing this game, make sure there are no latex allergies in the den.

Icon Activity 4: Den Yell

Share the three “R’s” of recycling—reduce, reuse, and recycle—and have the boys create a den yell using those three words. Two examples: “We don’t want to lose. So recycle, reduce, reuse!” “Help our earth not get the blues. Recycle, reduce, reuse!”

CLOSING

  • Have the Scouts lead the den yell they created. Remind them that a Scout is thrifty, and they can practice this quality by remembering to use the three “R’s” at home, at school, and in their community.

HouseGamesTigersPlay Do-at-Home Project Reminder:
Tell Scouts to bring one or more items for the recycled art project the den will build at the next meeting. They also need to collect aluminum cans from home, school, or a parent’s workplace for the “Monster Stomp.” The cans should be emptied and rinsed out, and make sure the boys wear strong shoes for the stomping.

AFTER THE MEETING

  • Serve refreshments, if desired.
  • Record completion of requirements 1, 3a, and 3b.
  • Work together to clean up the meeting place.

Meeting1Resources

DEN DUTY CHART (TALK TIME)

DEN DUTY CHART

Week 1 Duty Chart

CouncilFireDutyChart

Week 2 Duty Chart

CouncilFireDutyChart

Week 3 Duty Chart

CouncilFireDutyChart

Week 4 Duty Chart

CouncilFireDutyChart

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Meeting2Plan

PREPARATION AND MATERIALS

  • Miscellaneous craft items for the Recycled Art Project (scissors, glue, string, wire cutters, etc.).
  • Aluminum cans, large trash bag, and hand sanitizer for the “Monster Stomp” (Gathering)
  • Invite a military veteran, member of the fire department, police officer, or community service worker to talk to the den (requirement 5). The guest could be a family member of one of the Wolf Scouts.
  • Collect information and photos or illustrations related to each branch of the U.S. military and community service groups to share during Talk Time. If your guest is a veteran, he or she may provide assistance and help lead the discussion.
  • Flying disc or pie tin for team-building game
  • Thank-you card for Scouts to give to the guest who speaks to the den.

GATHERING: MONSTER STOMP (REQUIREMENT 6B)

As Scouts arrive with their aluminum cans, have them do the “Monster Stomp” outside—smashing the cans with their shoes for recycling. Once the cans are flattened, the boys will drop them into the trash bag to be carried later to a recycling center. Provide hand sanitizer for cleanup after all the cans are bagged. Keep a count of how many cans are brought, but don’t reveal the total to the Scouts until the Closing.

OPENING

  • Conduct a flag ceremony of your choosing that includes the Pledge of Allegiance and, as appropriate, the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
  • Have each Scout say what the word “brave” means to him.

TALK TIME

  • Carry out business items for the den.
  • Allow time for sharing among Cub Scouts.
  • Check the den duty chart, and remind the boys to complete their assigned duties.
  • Have each Wolf Scout share an idea on how to reduce, reuse, and recycle (requirement 6a). Ask them why the three “R’s” are important now and in the future. Have them give the den yell from Meeting 1 using the three “R’s.”
  • As a den, review the den’s choice of a community service project to be presented to the pack committee leaders for requirement 4a and completed for requirement 4b. If parts of the presentation require further preparation or practice, confirm that Scouts have a plan in place.

ACTIVITIES

Icon Activity 1: Military or Community Service Member Visit (Requirement 5)

  • Introduce the visitor to the den.
  • Discuss the role of the military in defending our country. Mention each branch of the U.S. services:
    — Air Force (protecting our country from the air, usually from bases on land)
    — Army (occupational infantry forces that move in after the assault forces)
    — Coast Guard (protecting U.S. coasts)
    — Marines (mobile assault infantry)
    — Navy (protecting our country from the ocean or the air, usually based on ships)
  • Guide the Scouts in asking questions related to the ways that community service workers such as your visitor help those in their communities.
  • Present the visitor with the prepared thank-you card from the Scouts.

Icon Activity 2: Recycled Art Project (Requirement 6c) IMAGEN

  • Have the boys create a project using the items they brought from home. This can be a picture, sculpture, or something that has moving parts. When they finish, they can name the project.
  • Make sure that none of the objects brought in by the boys are hazardous or unsanitary, and remind them that the completed project will be displayed at the next pack meeting, so it must be easy to transport.

Icon Activity 3: Perpetual Motion

  • Play this team-building game. (Remember that Scouting is a safe haven for everybody; no one should be forced to play a game if he doesn’t feel physically or emotionally comfortable with it.)
  • Scouts sit in a circle on a large playing area with a smooth surface. Give each Scout a number, and put a flying disc or pie tin in the center of the circle. The first player walks to the disc, turns it on its edge and spins it like a coin. Returning to sit, he calls out the number of another player who must reach the disc before it stops spinning, give it another spin, and call another player’s number before sitting down. The object of the game is to keep the disc spinning as long as possible.

CLOSING

  • Share how many cans were collected for the “Monster Stomp.” Then have the boys recite the Scout Law and ask them which points of the law their recycling represents (“a Scout is thrifty, helpful”).
  • Review details for the upcoming outing in Meeting 3. Make sure all Scouts and their families know the plans.

AFTER THE MEETING

  • Serve refreshments, if desired.
  • Record completion of requirements 5, 6a, 6b, and 6c.
  • Work together to clean up the meeting place.
  • Make arrangements with a parent or other adult to take the “Monster Stomp” cans to a recycling center.
  • Before the den outing in Meeting 3, coordinate with the pack committee to have the Scouts present their ideas for their service project. The service project for Meeting 3 will need to be scheduled to follow that presentation.

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Meeting3Plan

PREPARATION AND MATERIALS

  • Two sheets of colored paper—one red, one green—for the “Silent Red Light/Green Light Game” (Gathering)
  • 25-foot rope for team-building game

GATHERING

Silent Red Light/Green Light Game. The entire game should be played in silence with Scouts tiptoeing quietly as they move. Select a leader from among the boys, or a den chief or adult leader. This person holds two sheets of paper—one red and one green—but stands with his back to the Scouts, who stand side by side at a starting line. The leader then raises one of the sheets over his head, and the boys silently do whatever the color indicates: “go” at green and “stop” at red. Each time he switches to the other sheet, the boys must switch to that action. The boys must all move at the same pace, and when one of them reaches the leader, that Scout becomes the leader for the next round. Remind everyone that “a Scout is trustworthy,” so a boy must return to the starting line if he goes or stops at the wrong time.

OPENING

  • Conduct a flag ceremony of your choosing that includes the Pledge of Allegiance and, as appropriate, the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
  • Scouts should be prepared to perform a flag ceremony as part of the opening or closing of the pack committee leaders’ meeting.

TALK TIME

  • Carry out business items for the den.
  • Allow time for sharing among Cub Scouts.
  • Check the den duty chart, and remind the boys to complete their assigned duties. Adapt the duties as needed for the outing.

ACTIVITIES

Icon Activity 1: Community Service Proposal Presentation

  • As prepared, have Scouts present ideas and materials in support of their selected community service project to the committee. Scouts should be prepared to answer questions about their choice and how they will carry out the project.

Icon Activity 2: Tug of War

  • Play this team-building game. (Remember that Scouting is a safe haven for everybody; no one should be forced to play a game if he doesn’t feel physically or emotionally comfortable with it.)
  • Place the long rope in the center of the playing field and divide the boys into two teams, standing single file on either end of the rope. On the “Go” signal, each team tries to pull the other across a center line. After one team wins, have the Scouts play again without looking at each other as they pull. Does this change make a difference in the outcome and how they work together as teams?

CLOSING

Gather everyone in a circle and reflect on the lessons they learned about teamwork while playing the team-building games in this adventure. Connect this to the ways that military units, police officers, firefighters, and other community workers must work as teams in serving and protecting our country.

AFTER THE MEETING

  • Serve refreshments, if desired.
  • Record completion of requirements 2 and 4a.
  • Make arrangements with families to complete the approved service project for requirement 4b at a later time. Also make arrangements with the project site and clarify any restrictions or special requirements.
  • Work together to clean up the meeting place.

CouncilFireToonUpon completion of the Council Fire adventure, your Wolves will have earned the adventure loop shown here. Make sure they are recognized for their completion by presenting the adventure loops, to be worn on their belts, as soon as possible according to your pack’s tradition.

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