RATIONALE FOR ADVENTURE

Many boys join Scouting because they want to go camping. This adventure will introduce Wolves to several camping skills—selecting and bringing gear, participating with their families in campfire shows, and being prepared for bad weather. They will also learn about animals they might see, the Leave No Trace Principles for Kids, tying knots, and how to handle potentially harmful situations.

TAKEAWAYS FOR CUB SCOUTS

  • Outdoor essentials
  • Identifying animals
  • Tying square and overhand knots
  • Taking care of themselves in the wilderness
  • A Scout is obedient, courteous. [Wolf Character Compass]

ADVENTURE REQUIREMENTS (Wolf Handbook, page 30)

  1. While a Wolf Scout, attend a pack or family campout. If your chartered organization does not permit Cub Scout camping, you may substitute a family campout or a daylong outdoor activity with your den or pack.
  2. Show how to tie an overhand knot and a square knot.
  3. While on a den or family outing, identify four different types of animals. Explain how you identified them.
  4. With your family or den, make a list of possible weather changes that might happen on your campout according to the time of year you are camping. Tell how you will be prepared for each one.
  5. Show or demonstrate what to do:
    a. When a stranger approaches you, your family, or your belongings.
    b. In case of a natural disaster such as an earthquake or flood.
    c. To keep from spreading your germs.
  6. On the campout, participate with your family or den in a campfire show. Prepare a skit or song, and then present it at the campfire for everyone else.
  7. Do the following:
    a. Recite the Outdoor Code with your leader.
    b. Recite the Leave No Trace Principles for Kids with your leader. Talk about how these principles support the Outdoor Code.
    c. After your campout, list the ways you demonstrated being careful with fire.

NOTES TO DEN LEADER

For Meeting 3, Wolf Scouts may participate in a pack campout (requirement 1) or an alternative activity as permitted by their chartered organization. Confirm the campout plan with families, including transportation, all the necessary clothing, and any additional items they need to bring. Make sure a tour and activity plan has been submitted, if required, and activity consent forms are distributed, signed, and collected.

If Scouts will instead be going on family campouts, identify locations that will help them complete the requirements for this adventure.

See the Appendix for optional den meeting activities, including gatherings, openings, and closings.

meeting

PREPARATION AND MATERIALS NEEDED

  • U.S. and den flags
  • Plans for the upcoming pack campout—location, fees, gear list, food arrangements, etc.
  • Assorted flying discs and targets for the Gathering activity (see Meeting 1 Resources)
  • Information about how to identify animals, including photos or illustrations (Activity 1)
  • Slips of paper for the “Camping Charades” game (Activity 2)
  • Sample gear items for the campout, including the Cub Scout Six Essentials (Activity 3)

GATHERING

  • As Scouts arrive, have them practice throwing discs at targets. (See Meeting 1 Resources.)
  • Have each Scout write his favorite camping activity on a slip of paper, and put all of the papers in a hat, bowl, or other container.

OPENING

  • Conduct a flag ceremony of your choosing that includes the Pledge of Allegiance and, as appropriate, the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
  • Recite the Outdoor Code (requirement 7a; see the Wolf Handbook).
  • Recite the Leave No Trace Principles for Kids (requirement 7b; see the Wolf Handbook).

TALK TIME

  • Introduce the Call of the Wild adventure to the den. Build interest by describing the goals of the adventure and some of the activities that are planned.
  • Carry out business items for the den.
  • Allow time for sharing among Cub Scouts.
  • Share plans for the pack campout (see above). If some Scouts will be camping out with their families, discuss possible locations with the boys and their parents, and review everything they will need to bring.

ACTIVITIES

Icon Activity 1: Animal Identification (Requirement 3)

  • Using photos or illustrations, teach the Scouts how to identify four types of wild animals they may be able to see near their homes or on the campout. If possible, include examples of mammals, birds, insects, reptiles, and amphibians. (See Meeting 1 Resources.)
  • Have them go to requirement 3 in their Wolf Handbooks and write the name of each animal and how to identify it.
  • Show the boys some additional pictures that look similar, but are clearly not the types of animals that they will see on the campout. Have them pick out the differences.

Icon Activity 2: Camping Charades Game

  • Have each Scout pick one of the slips of paper they filled out during the Gathering and pretend to be doing that activity while the other boys try to guess what it is. Tell them not to use words or props— only actions—and give them time to plan the charade with help from adult leaders.
  • Ideas from this game can be worked into the campfire skit or song the Scouts will perform later with the den or their families (requirement 6). Suggest ways they might do this.

Icon Activity 3: Camping Gear

  • Discuss with the Scouts what gear they should bring on the campout for their own personal care and comfort, based on where and when they are camping. Don’t forget the Cub Scout Six Essentials! (See Meeting 1 Resources.) You should also cover items like tents, sleeping bags, ground cloths, pillows, sleeping pads or mattresses, warm clothes, raincoats, eating utensils, hats or caps, toothpaste, toothbrushes, etc.

CLOSING

  • The Grand Howl. To recognize their achievements during this meeting, form a circle and have each boy squat, make the Cub Scout sign with both hands, then lean forward and touch the ground between his feet. Then, like young wolves, all the Scouts raise their heads and give a long howl. When this is done, they all jump to their feet, raise their right hands high above their heads, and give the Cub Scout sign again, shouting, “Akela! We’ll—do—our—best!”

AFTER THE MEETING

  • Serve refreshments, if desired.
  • Record completion of requirements 3, 7a and 7b.
  • Work together to clean up the meeting place.
  • Prepare thank-you notes for the Scouts to sign at the next meeting.

Meeting1Resources

DISC GAMES (GATHERING)

Frisbee–style flying discs can be used for a variety of activities. The basic skill is easy, and the Gathering is a good time for Wolves to refine that skill without the need for much equipment or preparation. Try either of these two games, depending on the time you have available.

Target shooting. Lay out a field of “targets,” making sure to include a mix of shapes and sizes at various distances from the throwing line. Have Scouts try to hit the items by throwing the discs. As their skills increase, add a few challenges by removing the larger targets, moving some of them farther away, or providing ringshaped objects to shoot through (e.g., tires, hula-hoops).

Disc golf. Set up a course over a large field or backyard with markers for “holes.” The players must strike the markers to complete a hole, counting shots along the way. The course may include some obstacles to play around. The player with the lowest shot score wins. As a variation, let teams of two boys alternate taking shots to complete a hole.

ACTIVITIES

Icon Activity 1: Animal Identification

These tracks may be included as an illustration during the activity.

CallOfTheWildIdentificationAnimal

Icon Activity 3: Camping Gear

Cub Scout Six Essentials.

Review these items that each Cub Scout should carry in his personal gear when going on hikes or campouts. Suggest getting a small fanny pack or similar bag to organize the items and make them easy to carry without interfering with normal activities. Emphasize that these items are not intended for play and should be used only when needed.

  • First-aid kit—adhesive bandages, moleskin, gauze, antibiotic ointment, etc.
  • Water bottle—filled and large enough to last until it can be filled again
  • Flashlight—for emergency use only
  • Trail food—can be made as a den activity prior to hike or campout
  • Sun protection—sunscreen of SPF 30 or greater and a hat
  • Whistle—also for emergency use only

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Meeting2Plan

PREPARATION AND MATERIALS NEEDED

  • U.S. and den flags
  • Several non-transparent bags, each with a camping item inside for the shape guessing game (Gathering)
  • Small bottle of soap and a basin or pot filled with water for hand cleaning (Gathering)
  • Whiteboard and a marker for Talk Time
  • Examples of gear and clothing needed in case of bad weather (Talk Time)
  • Ropes for knot tying and the knot relay game—6" length for each Scout (Activity 1)
  • If needed, invite some Boy Scouts or adult volunteers to help as the Wolves learn to tie knots. Have examples on hand of finished overhand and square knots, so they can compare their work.

GATHERING

  • Shape guessing. Let each Scout reach into one of the bags prepared for the game and try to guess the camping item inside. Then reveal the contents of each bag.
  • Hand cleaning. Have each boy demonstrate how he would wash his hands on a campout, using the water basin and liquid soap (requirement 5c).

OPENING

  • Conduct a flag ceremony of your choosing that includes the Pledge of Allegiance and, as appropriate, the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

TALK TIME

  • Carry out business items for the den.
  • Allow time for sharing among Cub Scouts.
  • Discuss plans for the upcoming pack campout or campouts with families.
  • Reveal the items that were hidden in bags for the shape guessing game. Discuss hygiene items and gear needed for campouts, making sure to review again the Cub Scout Six Essentials (see Meeting 1 Resources).
  • Discuss the Leave No Trace principles and how they support the Outdoor Code (requirements 7a and 7b; see the Appendix). Emphasize that Wolves are focusing especially on the Outdoor Code’s call to “Be careful with fire.” Talk about ways the boys will demonstrate this principle during the campout.

ACTIVITIES

Icon Activity 1: Safety Check (Requirements 4 and 5)

  • Discuss what the boys should do if a stranger approaches them or their family members, and call their attention to the tips in the Wolf Handbook (requirement 5a). Another good resource can be found on the National Crime Prevention Council website: www.ncpc.org/topics/violent-crime-and-personal-safety/strangers/. Use the whiteboard and marker to help as you lead the discussion.
  • Show the bad weather gear and clothing you collected, and describe how each item might be useful if the weather changes drastically while you are camping.
  • Talk about what to do in case a natural disaster occurs during a campout, including each type of disaster listed in the handbook (requirement 5b). Have Wolf Scouts write in their handbooks one thing they can do if any one of those disasters strikes. Don’t let the talk get bogged down in hypothetical scenarios—keep it realistic, so the boys can quickly solve the situations. Is your area prone to flooding, earthquakes, wildfires, windstorms, blizzards, or monsoons? Refer to www.ready.gov or other online resources dealing with disaster preparation and recovery.

Icon Activity 2: Knot Tying/Knot Relay Game (Requirement 2)

Show the boys how to tie these two knots, based on the instructions in the Wolf Handbook. Give each boy time to practice and demonstrate what he he has learned. Then, if time permits, play the Knot Relay Game.

  • Overhand knot. This type is used to prevent a rope from going completely through a pulley or a hole. It can also be a starter for tying shoes or be used to keep the end of a rope from unraveling.

CallOfTheWildOverhandKnot

  • Square knot. Also called a reef knot, this can be used to tie two ropes together or to tie packages, rig sails, or tie the ends of a bandage.

CallOfTheWildSquareKnot

  • Knot Relay Game. Divide Scouts into two teams, each standing in single- file lines. Lay two ropes on the floor about 20 feet from the start line. The first Scout in each team runs to the rope, ties an overhand knot, shows it to a judge, unties it, and runs back to tag the next boy in his team. Once this relay is finished, you can repeat it using square knots.

Icon Activity 3: Campfire Show Planning

  • Have Wolf Scouts work together to brainstorm some ideas for a campfire show to perform at the upcoming den outing. Ideas can include simple songs, skits, or other creative acts. Help ensure that each Scout is included and has a role in the show. Scouts will practice for the show as a Do-at-Home Project.

CLOSING

  • Gather the den in a Friendship Circle. Using their ropes from Activity 2, have each Scout tie his rope to his neighbor’s with a square knot until a rope circle is formed. Standing around the circle, the Scouts hold the rope with their left hands while making the Cub Scout sign with their right. The den leader then recites this quote from Lord Baden-Powell: Every Scout ought to be able to tie a knot. To tie a knot seems a simple thing, and yet there are right and wrong ways of doing it, and Scouts ought to know the right way. Very often it happens that lives depend on a knot being properly tied.
  • Review details for the upcoming campout or outing in Meeting 3. Make sure all Scouts and their families know the plans.

HouseGamesTigersPlayDo-at-Home Project Reminder:
Wolves should practice a skit or song for the campfire show with their family or the whole den (requirement 6).

AFTER THE MEETING

  • Serve refreshments, if desired.
  • Record completion of requirements 2, 4, and 5.
  • Work together to clean up the meeting place.
  • Have Scouts sign thank-you notes to give to anyone who helps the den during the pack campout.

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Meeting3Plan

PREPARATION AND MATERIALS NEEDED

  • Camping gear, including Cub Scout Six Essentials and all items needed from checklist in Wolf Handbook
  • Food for cooking meals
  • A skit or song for participating in the campfire show with any props or costumes needed for the presentation
  • Confirm that a tour and activity plan has been submitted, if required, and that transportation to and from the event is in place. Secure activity consent forms.
  • Unit den leader should have in possession (if required by local council practices) the tour and activity plan and a copy of the Guide to Safe Scouting.

GATHERING

Remind the Scouts of the slogan, “Take only memories, leave only footprints,” and the adage that Scouts always leave a campsite better than they found it. Wolf Scouts focus on the Outdoor Code principle of “Be careful with fire.” Discuss ways that they can demonstrate this principle when they are at a campsite, using the Wolf Handbook’s guidelines for requirements 7a, b, and c as a resource. Point out to them the things that previous campers may have left behind and remind them that if we leave it here also, other campers will think it was ours. So let’s clean up!

OPENING

  • Say the Pledge of Allegiance and, as appropriate, the Scout Oath and Scout Law. If the den does not have a United States flag, ask one Scout to display the flag on his uniform for the group.
  • Go over the activities planned for the outing.
  • Share the time that the dinner preparation will begin.
  • Share the time the campfire will begin.

TALK TIME

  • Carry out business items for the den.
  • Allow time for sharing among Cub Scouts.

ACTIVITIES

Icon Activity 1: Animal Identification (Requirement 3)

Make sure each Scout identifies four different types of animals during the campout and explains how he identified them. Animals can include birds, insects, and other animals.

Icon Activity 2: Human Chain Race

  • Have Wolf Scouts line up single file and in two teams. (Have an adult join one of the teams if you have an odd number of boys.) Each player then reaches down between his legs with his right hand and grabs the left hand of the Scout behind him to make one long chain. On the “Go” signal, both teams race forward around an established turning point and back to the finish line. If one of the chains breaks, the team must stop and re-form before continuing.

Icon Activity 3: Perform Skit or Song (Requirement 6)

Have the Scouts perform their skits or songs at the campfire show. Check to make sure any needed props or costumes are ready to go.

CLOSING

  • The closing for this meeting may be part of the ending of the campfire, or possibly the morning after camping out. It should be inspirational and ideally reference the outdoors.
  • Have each Scout list in his copy of the Wolf Handbook how he demonstrated the principle of “Be careful with fire” during the campout (requirement 7c).

AFTER THE MEETING

  • Record completion of requirements 1, 3, 6, and 7c.
  • Work together to clean up the campsite.
  • Send thank-you notes to those who helped.

CallOfTheWildToonUpon completion of the Call of the Wild adventure, your Wolves will have earned the adventure loop shown here. Make sure they are recognized for their completion by presenting the adventure loops, to be worn on their belts, as soon as possible according to your pack’s tradition.

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